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Archive for the ‘Visiting Lilly’ Category

VL 4 Traditonal detectives

As you’re probably aware by now, Book 2 in my Jake Talbot Investigates series, Saving Anna, is due for release REALLY soon. I’m so excited by the approaching launch of my new book that I thought it would be great to offer book 1 for free between 9th – 13th November. Grab your copy!

This is a terrific opportunity to meet British Detective Jake Talbot and join him in unravelling the mystery of a romance that crosses the boundaries of time. Why doesn’t anyone want young Frankie Hayward to visit an old woman named Lilly? Why is the Ministry of Defence interested in Frankie? Can Jake manage to set aside the unhappy memories of Christmas past, and keep working through the festive season: or will he crack under the strain?

Find out in Visiting Lilly

 

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Once upon a time Booktrope came along and changed everything…they offered me a publishing contract. With Booktrope we do what is termed ‘team publishing,’ in that we create a team consisting of author, editor, book manager, project manager, proof reader and cover designer, all working together to generate the best book possible before it goes to press. But today I’m not here to talk about the specifics of an individual project, I’m here to talk about the much larger possibilities that Booktrope offers its authors.

Montana Book FestivalBooktrope itself is one large family, with everyone helping each other out and flagging up opportunities. Maybe what’s on offer is as simple as someone offering to buddy-up over a coffee (Or virtual coffee via Skype) because they work in a particular industry and have insider knowledge that will help you perfect a scene, or maybe it’s a chance for visual exposure to the industry, such as being asked if you’d like to share table space at the Montana Book Festival. On my own I would never have heard of, thought of, or even dreamt of having my novel Visiting Lilly represented at the prestigious Montana Book Festival. After all, I live in the UK, not America.

Visiting Lilly at Montana Book FestivalSo, when Booktrope’s highly talented author Paula Marie Coomer sent round a message inviting fellow Tropers to take part in the Montana Book Festival, I was eager to be involved. My enthusiasm stemmed not from anticipated book sales, but a deep understanding that to display my novel to a wider audience offers traction to becoming a recognised author.

PMC at Montana Book FestivalI caught up with Paula on her return and asked how the festival had gone and what she’d brought away from the experience that she’d like to share with other authors.

Here’s Paula’s excellent report.

First, I’d like to thank Guy Pace  for joining me. We had such a fun time chatting back and forth and talking to all the wonderful folks who came past our table. Guy was relentless! He is a great front man who would not let people not talk to him. It was a wonderful thing to see. Also have to give a shout out to Barb Drozdowich Jae Carvel Massimo Marino  Kandi J Wyatt Allan Ament  Tess Thompson Toni Allen  for providing books and swag. We didn’t sell too much, but we talked to lots of people about Booktrope, gave out most of the handouts about the Booktrope website, and talked to a number of authors looking for a literary home.

PMC Montana5What events like this always remind me of is how much writing is being done out there, how many writers there are, how many ways of approaching the writing life and task of writing, how many different goals writers have, how many different types of books and publishers, and just how alive and well and buzzing the world of books is. I ached for those authors out there roaming the world looking for a publisher. We all remember what that was like.

Guy Pace at Montana Book FestivalIt was also my first time to be on the vendor side of things. I have previously only attended writing and book conferences as an author or presenter. I’d never considered setting up a vendor table as an author. In this case, I registered as Booktrope since we had a number of BT authors represented. What I didn’t know is that the name and logo for Booktrope would be published far and wide. It got me thinking about name recognition and how setting up at festivals like this might be quite a boon for new book authors who are trying to get their work and name out there. One of the most interesting moments was talking to a physicist from New Mexico about Massimo Marino’s trilogy (Massimo is a physicist). The man didn’t buy a book, but I’m guessing he won’t forget the conversation he had with Guy about it. My point is, what are the chances of connecting with someone like that? If Massimo had been there, I’m sure the man would have purchased the book. (Hmm. Maybe having authors standing by on Skype or Facetime next time? Very 21st century.) We connected with him because of what he does for a living. It made me think about the fact that I have a book about a nurse, but have I ever reached out to the nursing community around it? No! Why is that? Why wouldn’t I think of doing that first?

Barb at Montana Book FestivalIt made me realize, once again, that hands-on selling may be expensive, in terms of what it takes to get us out there in the world, but it is an adjunct to online promotion and can, in fact, give new direction to our online promotions. Maybe we need to think more deeply about the populations represented in our books. Who are the outliers? Who else might we have missed? (I’m thinking in my first novel, also, of how much a part the natural world plays, yet it now dawns on me that I’ve never once thought to introduce the book to a group of naturalists interested in our well-studied geographical region.)

Jae Carvel at Montana Book FestivalAlso, what about groups you identify with? Guy has a passion for Harleys, so he’s been talking up his book to a Harley group he’s connected with online. How brilliant. A Harley rider who wrote a book. Anyone who rides Harleys or loves motorcycles might perk up an ear. It makes complete sense.

Allan Ament at Montana Book FestivalGuy also knew enough about the White Sands proving grounds to be able to take the conversation down that road a ways–engaging that physicist further. Who’s to say the man didn’t go right home and order Massimo’s book? In fact, several people wrote down names and titles of several books. Speaks also to the value of swag–bookmarks, handouts, drop cards–all of it serves a purpose. Getting yourself in front of people and making a memorable impression–it’s as old as marketing itself, but you can’t put a price on that human connection. One woman I talked to at the table reached out to me later and ended up telling me a huge piece of her life. I was able to say something that made her see that piece of herself differently. She started to cry. Came back to my table and bought a book. Humanness sells books twice as fast as tricks and flash and fast-talking. It comes down to making connection. None of this is new, but I was so impressed by this over and over again.

Lastly, the people selling the big numbers of books were the people selling and presenting, so you know I will be putting my proposal in for next year. I’ll also have a Booktrope table, too, however.

All of this is to say–when you see a call for proposals for a book festival or conference, don’t be shy. Get together with some other authors and share the cost of a table.

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Visiting Lilly by Toni AllenAs a novelist, everything I write is a mixture of fact and fiction, even when describing well-known local locations. Hence, if you ever visit Farnham, Surrey, UK, the setting for Visiting Lilly, Book 1 in my Jake Talbot Investigates mystery series, you might notice that some of the places aren’t described exactly as they are in real life. My intention isn’t to deceive the unsuspecting tourist, after all I’m not writing a tour guide, but a work of fiction. If, by making something a little taller, bigger or shinier it enhances a dramatic scene, then my imagination will stretch reality for the sake of my art and my reader’s involvement with the story.

Maltings Riverside Cafe Bar

The Riverside Cafe Bar at Farnham Maltings, where Talbot and Frankie have lunch together in Visiting Lilly

Several scenes in Visiting Lilly take place at Farnham Maltings. The historic building started life prior to 1750, when it was used as a tannery. Later, in 1845, it was taken over by a brewery for malting their grain, and remained in use by various breweries until brewing methods changed and the building was abandoned in 1956. Eventually Courage sold the building to the town and work began on transforming it into an arts and community centre. The first Maltings Market took place in the Great Hall in October 1970.

I’ve been going to the Maltings for years. It’s a fabulous venue for exhibitions, and I know an artist who rents studio space within the building. You can also listen to concerts, from classical to rock. The most memorable perfomance I’ve ever attended being by the incredible Dame Emma Kirkby when she sang at the Maltings back in the 80’s.

These days I regularly lunch in the Riverside Cafe Bar with fellow writers, and we sit in the sunshine discussing plot dilemmas over a cappuccino, the table covered in manuscripts and note books. We envisage ourselves as bohemian and creative, and what better place to do it than Farnham Maltings.

Maltings Great Hall flea market

Maltings Great Hall flea market showing the stage where Talbot sees Kate selling her paintings in a scene from Visiting Lilly

It’s the Maltings Market which interests Detective Inspector Jake Talbot, he’s an avid collector of antiques and has a keen eye for a bargain.

In the excerpt below you’ll see that I’ve made the rather rickety looking railing on the stage sound a little grander when Kate leans over it to look at Talbot. I took this photo at the end of the day, when the market was winding down, but you still gain a feel for the bartering and excitement of hunting for treasure.

 

I’ve also created a Pinterest board to show how I imagine Kate’s painting of the Bluebell Wood might look.

Excerpt from Visiting Lilly: Talbot bumps into Frankie at Farnham Maltings Market, then discovers Kate is there as well.

Bright winter sunshine dazzled as it bounced off puddles. Using his space at the station saved on parking. Talbot smiled. The Maltings was only a spit away and sunshine meant there would be more stalls outside and rich pickings. Unfortunately it also meant there would be more punters, but that was okay, he knew what he was looking for and most of them were casual browsers. Only sometimes the idiots beat him to a gem, so he’d learnt to perfect that disinterested look, and that sneer, and that knack of putting rivals off the scent of a bargain. Mostly he collected nothing in particular, just anything that took his fancy, from china, to Bakelite, to definitely not silver—all those hallmarks and tarnish putting him off. Junk, Claire had called it, but if it fascinated him, who cared? These days the halls were peppered with modern stuff, too: silk paintings, arty photographs, and occasionally the work of some new local artist.

There was one today, up on the stage at the back of the hall, the canvases large and inviting, the semi-abstract landscapes of woodland scenes done with daubs of bright colours. A fresh vista of bluebells with sunshine filtering down through a lime-green leafy wood caught his attention. It was tempting. Yes, he quite liked that; it definitely had a certain something. People kept getting in his way as he tried to stand back and get a feel for what it might look like in his hallway. They were browsing, only half interested, standing too close to truly appreciate the design. Damn, would the same happen in his hall?

Moving on, he went upstairs to visit a man he knew sold mirrors. Well, he was never one to buy something without judging the competition, yet anxiety riddled him with impatience in case someone beat him to that painting. Perhaps he should go back and buy it before it went. Halfway down the stairs he collided with Hayward going in the opposite direction.

‘Wouldn’t expect to see you here,’ Hayward said, instinctively holding out his hand for Talbot to shake.

Talbot shook it, as gentlemen did when they met. ‘On a mission to buy a painting before someone snaps it up.’

‘Mind if I have a look?’

‘Not at all. What brings you here?’

Hayward about-turned, fell into step beside him, and together they pushed through the crowd.

‘Someone told me there’s a dealer here who’s an expert on Capo Di Monte figurines. I need to arrange a valuation for the insurers.’

‘They were worth at least two grand.’ Talbot halted by the steps that went up to the stage. ‘I can let you have copies of all the photos we took.’

‘That would be useful, thank you.’ Hayward stepped back and let people through as they barged past. ‘You know about antiques, don’t you, Mr Talbot?’

‘A little.’ Starting with a vibration in his pocket Talbot’s mobile burst into ‘Broken Wings’ by Mr Mister, giving him the clue it was a victim of crime. ‘Excuse me,’ he said to Hayward, read the name, and hurried to answer it before every head turned to locate the outburst of rock music. ‘Kate, thanks for calling me back.’

‘Are you stalking me?’

Taken aback, he hesitated. ‘No, I was wanting to speak with you.’

‘So, just because I didn’t get back to you immediately, you decided to track me down and upset my work.’ She made an infuriated grunting noise down the phone. ‘Well, I can’t talk to you now. I don’t want to discuss details of my private life in public.’

‘Kate, Kate, I’m off duty, at Farnham Maltings …’

‘I know where you bloody well are! I can see you from here.’

You can? Looking up the length of the great hall, Talbot tried to recognise her amidst the clamour of stalls and punters. What would she be wearing? She’d look different without her coat and hat. Nope. Slowly he pivoted round three hundred and … ah, that would be her, standing up on the stage, in front of the painting he wanted to buy. Yep, that was her alright, glaring down at him, not even bothering to wave.

‘What are you selling?’ he asked, and smiled up at her, his heart sinking before he’d even heard the answer.

‘My paintings.’

‘Then I’ll leave you to it.’ He was going to hang up and walk away, but she rushed towards the railings at the edge of the stage and peered down at him, saying, ‘Were you really just walking around?’
He nodded. She was almost loud enough not to need to the phone, her words carrying down across the babble of voices bartering below. Frankie was following his gaze, tracking it up to where she stood, the painting a glorious backdrop to her shock of dark hair. It really was not a good idea for the two of them to meet, for them to get stuck in awkward conversation, until one of them eventually blurted out the name Charteris or Lilly.

Visiting Lilly free on Kindle Unlimited

 

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Goodreads giveaway Visiting Lilly

Imagine yourself sitting there with a lovely cup of your favourite brew reading a copy of Visiting Lilly. From now, right through to October the 15th, there’s a copy up for grabs in my Goodreads Giveaway. The Giveaway is open to US and UK residents. The restriction is purely to keep costs down as it’s a paperback I’ll be sending out.

Visiting Lilly introduces Detective Inspector Jake Talbot, a man with a deep sense of justice and a personal tragedy that haunts him, especially at Christmas. Talbot can’t understand why a man at a Surrey police station should go ballistic because someone tries to visit Lilly, his elderly grandmother. He’s intrigued, and this little puzzle might serve to distract him from sorrows of a Christmas past.

Soon he’s entangled with Frankie, an odd young man who claims to have met Lilly in her youth. Talbot dismisses the notion of time travel, but then discovers the Ministry of Defence has been monitoring Frankie since his childhood friend disappeared ten years previously. Forced to work with the MOD, Talbot unearths family secrets and betrayals. The families act ruthlessly to prevent him from discovering the facts, colluding to ruin him.

If Frankie is innocent, Talbot won’t let him be victimised. An uneasy understanding grows between them as they follow the evidence, for only the truth will allow Frankie to visit Lilly.

Visiting Lilly is a story of mystery, murder and a question of time travel.

Why not enter the Goodread Giveaway right now.

Book 2 in the Jake Talbot Investigates series, Saving Anna, is due for release this October.

Detective Inspector Jake Talbot hates working undercover. Yet, when ordered to Dorset to observe a sinister cult for the Ministry of Defence, he accepts, because the group’s beliefs pose a direct threat to his sister Anna. How far will Jake go to save his sister?

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Virginia Woolf famously said, “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.” So, what do we do if we don’t have both of these much desired essentials? Do we throw ourselves down on the floor screaming, “I’ll never be a writer!”? Not at all. Writers are made of far stronger stuff.

Camping in Dorset

Yes, I have space at home to write, as many authors do, but that doesn’t mean that I necessarily have the freedom to write without constant interruptions.

For several weeks of the year I create that much needed ‘room of her own’ in which to write. I pack my little car to the hilt with camping gear and head off to Dorset. On a fabulous campsite with views across Chesil Beach we pitch our tent. It isn’t a fun-park, theme-park type of campsite, especially not out of season when I choose to go. It’s tranquil. Bordering a nature reserve, the noisiest things we hear at night are the owls hooting in the trees overhead, and the waves crashing against far off pebbles. Unless it’s harvest time and the farmers have to work all night to get their crops in before it rains! On those nights we hear combine harvesters rumbling across distant fields, and rush out to see them lit up like spaceships manoeuvring in the dark. It’s all part of the fun.

Now, I expect you’re envisaging a little two man tent and a camp fire flickering under the stars. Nothing quite so romantic, I’m afraid; but I expect you’ve already sneaked a peek at the photo, haven’t you? My tent is a veritable mansion! The label says it sleeps six adults, and yes, there are only two of us. Furthermore, we cheat. We pay a bit extra so that we can have an electric hook-up to power my laptop, run a light and boil a kettle. When it’s really cold we also plug in a heater. This enormous space is no longer a tent: it’s the author’s hub.

My partner and I use the main living area for sitting and chatting, and eating together. We cook in the little front canopy. The sleeping area we fill with king-size inflatable mattresses, sleeping bags and extremely warm duvets. It can get very cold in Dorset in September. Of an evening, this sleeping compartment becomes my ‘room of her own.’ After supper I say the now famous words, “I’m going in.” My partner nods sagely and switches the kettle on. Once inside my room, with the partitioning flap zipped up, I sit cross legged on my mattress, set up my laptop, and pull the duvet around my shoulders. After a while my partner calls, “Tea’s ready,” and I unzip the dividing flap just enough to reach out and be handed my mug of tea.

From then on I write, mostly straight through until morning. Zipped in my secret room, with the light filtering through from the living area, I’m in a world all of my own. It’s magic. Every so often I pass my empty mug out through the flap, and miraculously it gets filled up again with hot tea. It’s very much like having a room of my own with service!

Please don’t think that I totally ignore my partner. During the day we go for long walks, and I take photographs of the wildlife: or we go into Bridport, West Bay or Weymouth and meet some of the locals. Every Saturday in Bridport there’s a flea-market, and we love to go along and have a good rummage, pick up something vintage or a few crystals from one of our favourite stall-holders. Speaking of crystals, in West Bay you can find pieces of calcite along the cliff faces, and fossils as well if you’re lucky.

Rainbow over the Fleet - DorsetSometimes we just walk and talk. On one such occasion we were walking along the Fleet from the campsite to Old Fleet Church, having great fun discussing and enacting a fight scene I was in the process of writing in Saving Anna. Passers-by must have thought we were completely mad, as we kept pretending to strike one-another with a knife, which to them would have been quite invisible. At times a piece of driftwood stood in for the weapon, and then we had to explain that I was an author, and that we weren’t really having a punch-up and trying to hurt each other. By the time we got back to the tent, some three hours later at dusk, we’d finalised the fight scene; every move choreographed to perfection, every word spoken flowing smoothly. We were excited. It was so well planned.

“I’ll make supper,” my partner said. “While you go in and get it written down.”
So, in I went, the action we’d outlined fresh in my mind. I read through the couple of paragraphs I’d already written leading up to the fight scene, drank tea: then began typing.
Within fifteen minutes I called out, “Sorry!”
My partner rushed to the partitioning flap and whispered, “What’s happened?”
“As soon as I started writing, Talbot went and did something completely different,” I explained. “I couldn’t help it. He just didn’t want the fight to end up like that.”
My partner sighed, heavily. “That man Talbot’s a rogue. You can never trust him to follow orders.”
We laughed, but you see, this is what happens, when a woman has a room of her own in which to write fiction. In the peace and solitude of one’s own space, the story takes on a life all of its own.

Saving Anna is the second book in the Jake Talbot Investigates series: due for release this autumn. Book 1 Visiting Lilly is available on Amazon and free on Kindle Unlimited.

Visiting Lilly free on Kindle Unlimited

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I’ve been writing fiction for many, many years, and during this time I’ve met numerous aspiring authors. It doesn’t matter whether we write detective mysteries or period romance, we all tend to have one thing in common – self-doubt. We constantly wonder whether an agent will like our work, whether a publisher will accept our work, and most of all, whether the readers will relate to our work and take our characters to their hearts.

So, how do we overcome this demon?

For my own part I remind myself of the high praise I received from one of the world’s top crime writers, P.D. James.

Embed from Getty Images

At the time I was living on the Isle of Wight and an active member of two exceptionally good writing groups. One group focused on critique and perfecting craft, while the other had built a strong list of famous authors who were willing to attend as speakers. When this latter group decided to run a nationwide competition, they invited P.D. James to judge the finalists, and select the winner. Graciously, she accepted. The theme was: The First Chapter of a Novel.

As a group we were all encouraged to enter something to support the competition, but as it was we needn’t have concerned ourselves about lack of entries, because we ended up with well over a thousand submissions. The piece I submitted was from a work in progress, a rather complex novel I was busy plotting, that had three time-lines I was trying to thread together. I’d written about 15,000 words. For the competition I decided to polish my first chapter, which started, “I know I am in a dream,” written from a man’s first person viewpoint. I was happy enough with my submission, but with so many entries flooding in, didn’t concern myself over winning or losing.

When the big day came for the winner to be announced, and the prize to be handed over, the only person who knew the outcome was P.D. James herself. Not even the writing group’s chairman was privy to the result. The meeting hall we’d booked for the occasion was packed, and the event started with P.D. James giving a talk on her writing methods, and explaining how she drew inspiration from newspaper headlines. A story would pique her interest, usually a topic that had social impact, such as adopted children being permitted to trace their birth parents; then she’d set to researching facts and building characters.

Once we’d all taken a break and afternoon tea had been served, we sat down to hear the results of our competition. Third prize: not me. Second prize: not me. P.D. James started to say how very much she’d enjoyed the winning entry and how extremely well written it was. Then she named the winner. First Prize goes to… Oh my goodness me! That was my name! I couldn’t believe it. I was stunned.

P.D. James asked if the winner was in the room and would they like to step up to the table. I stood.

“I don’t believe it!” she exclaimed. “I thought this piece was written by a man.” She stood, her face alight with excitement. “You’re a woman writing in a man’s viewpoint. I was completely convinced it was a man’s voice. This makes it an even stronger winner. I read your name and assumed you were a man!” She applauded me. This great crime writer stood and gave me a standing ovation. Then she shook my hand and handed me the best prize ever, her praise.

This took place back in the late ‘80s. Shortly after this amazing occasion, life events hit me hard and I suddenly found myself thrust into having to cope with exceptional circumstances. My writer friends told me not to worry if I couldn’t find the time or concentration to write, and assured me that I was building a storehouse of experiences which one day I would draw upon and use in my novels. They were absolutely correct.

I never did finish the complex novel P.D. James so loved, but she gave me the confidence to never stop writing. Since then I have written many other novels, and never given up on my dream of becoming a published author. In 2014 when Booktrope accepted Visiting Lilly, my dream came true.

Book 2 in the Jake Talbot Investigates series, Saving Anna, is due for release this autumn.

If you’re an aspiring author, what keeps you going, and pushing beyond self-doubt? I’d love to hear your story.

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The summer is here and it’s time to laze around in the sunshine reading a good book. For those of you who enjoy reading thrillers and mysteries we’ve created a fantastic bumper giveaway: 16 thrilling books on offer, and a $50 Amazon Gift Card.

Thank you to everyone who entered. The Giveaway is now closed and we have a winner.

 

Thrilling Summer Giveaway FB Post(1)What’s in the goodies bag?

I’m thrilled to be first on the list, because Saving Anna, Book 2 in my series Jake Talbot Investigates is due for release this autumn.

If you can’t wait to read Visiting Lilly you can download it for free with Amazon Prime.

Visiting Lilly by Toni Allen Visiting Lilly by Toni Allen

Jake Talbot Investigates (Book 1)

Why should a man at a Surrey police station go ballistic because someone tries to visit Lilly, his elderly grandmother? Jake Talbot investigates a romance that crosses the boundaries of time.

“This a fantastic, unusual story, brilliantly written and thoroughly enjoyable.” Stu – Amazon review

Shadow Dancer by Addison KlineShadow Dancer by Addison Kline

Some secrets should just stay buried. On the day Tristan Morrow is born her mother goes missing, prompting an investigation that produces no solid leads.

“Lots of twists and turns and suspense.” D.Y. Danis – Amazon review

 

Rachels Folly by Monica BrunoRachel’s Folly by Monica Bruno

Rachel’s best friend is about to be married, but her fiancé is a mysterious man with seemingly no friends or family. After a night of drinking goes awry, Rachel is forced to face a dark part of herself she didn’t know existed.

“This well written page turner shows how one person can mess up so many lives.” Sharon H – Amazon review

The Anonymous Source by A.C.FullerThe Anonymous Source by A.C. Fuller

One year after the 9/11 attacks, Alex Vane–a brilliant, carb-obsessed reporter for The New York Standard–wants nothing more than to break into the flashy world of TV news. But when he uncovers the scoop of a lifetime, his editor buries his story, a source turns up dead, and Alex finds himself at the center of a violent media conspiracy.

This Grisham style read kept me guessing.” Nisi4man – Amazon review

Sandcastles and Other Stories by Justin BogSandcastle and Other Stories by Justin Bog

The Complete Edition of Justin Bog’s First Collection of Dark Psychological Suspense Tales.

“This enchanting short story collection deftly examines the psychology of life.” Mrs J Lobb – Amazon review

 

What Echoes Render by Tamsen SchultzWhat Echoes Render by Tamsen Schultz

Betrayal was something Jesse Baker thought she already knew too much about. But when her dead husband’s past comes back to haunt her, both the life she’s built for herself and her sons, and the story she’s told herself to make it through, threaten to crumble into ashes.

“If you’re a romance suspense reader you will love this book.” L R Smith – Amazon review

Macyn's Letter by S.L. StackerMacyn’s Letter by S.L. Stacker

A near-death experience at the hands of her husband would cause any woman to cling to her crippling trust issues and dating phobia, and Macyn McIntyre is no exception.

“Pleasantly surprised for a great read from a new author!” Tonia Molino – Amazon review

 

Awake by Melanie SuraniAwake by Melanie Surani

Opera singer Joshua Gray wakes in an eerie art museum exhibit. He comes to believe he’s been kidnapped and abandoned. And he isn’t the only one…

“The ride didn’t end until the very last page – and what a ride!” funky_town – Amazon review

 

All the pretty bones by Camela ThompsonAll the Pretty Bones by Camela Thompson

After ten years of living in the shadow of her stalker, a diagnosis of terminal cancer pushes Olivia Kardos to take matters into her own hands.

“There are many interesting twists and turns throughout the book with moments of horror and others hopefulness.” Linda Ragland – Amazon review

Blood, Spirit and Bone by Camela ThompsonBlood, Spirit & Bone by Camela Thompson

Olivia lives, but Lucian’s part in saving her may cost him his life.

“I’m always surprised when an author can keep me guessing and keep my nose buried in a book.” Kristina M Covington – Amazo review

 

Veronica Layne gets the Scoop by Julia Park TraceyVeronika Layne Gets the Scoop by Julia Park Tracey

Veronika Layne. Sassy, tattooed, twenty-something newspaper reporter. Never saw herself working for the “man.” When her small weekly is swallowed up by Singh Media Group, that’s exactly where she ends up.

“This book is a sexy adventure, a breezy story with mystery and romance that was a joy to read.”

Inhuman Interest by Eric TurowskiInhuman Interest by Eric Turowski

Thirteen words in a want-ad turn Tess Cooper’s world upside down after she signs on as a paranormal research assistant to the mysterious Davin Egypt.

“There is no sleep when reading this book! Seat gripping!” Peggy Salkill (UNDERCOVER BOOK REVIEWS) – Amazon review

 

Roses are Red Violet is Dead by Monica-Marie VincentRoses are Red Violet is Dead by Monica-Marie Vincent

Violet Sumner has a stalker. Between her largely dysfunctional family of two and the friends she doesn’t feel particularly close to, Violet thinks he’s the least of her problems.

“Novel is intense, and suspense filled with fully developed characters that feel like your own family members and close friends.” Nonie Peterson – Amazon review

OP DEC Operation Deceit K. WilliamsOP-DEC: Operation Deceit by K. Willaims

Claire’s father sends her mother away, declaring she is hysterical with fatigue. Displaced by this disastrous outcome, Claire is brought to New York by her spirited aunt, to be raised beyond the reach of the damaging turn of events.

“The story is intense! I often found myself on the edge of my seat.” Victor A. Rodriguez – Amazon review

Women in Red by Jordan Rosenfeld

Diamond Run by Michael Croucher http://www.michaelcroucherbooks.com/

 

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